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Styrene


Styrene

Styrene, also known as vinyl benzene, is an organic compound with the chemical formula C6H5CH=CH2. Styrene, the derivative of benzene is a colorless oily liquid, which evaporates easily and has a sweet smell, although high concentrations confer a less pleasant odor. Styrene is the precursor to polystyrene and several copolymers.

Styrene is an organic hydrocarbon used to manufacture rubber and plastic components. Also known as vinyl benzene, styrene is a colorless liquid that quickly evaporates when exposed to the air. Although it is an aromatic monomer with a slightly sweet smell, its odor can be unpleasant in high concentrations or when mixed with other chemicals. If the molecules of Styrene become linked to form long chains of styrene, it becomes polystyrene, an aromatic polymer with thermoplastic properties.

While Styrene is manufactured from petroleum on a commercial scale, it also occurs naturally in certain plants, including fruits, nuts, and vegetables. In fact, Styrene received its name in honor of the Styrax genus of trees that produce a sap from which benzoin resin is obtained. Its alternate name of vinyl benzene likely stems from the fact that it is synthesized from ethylbenzene, which is the product of benzene and ethylene being subjected to catalytic dehydrogenation. Styrene molecules also contain a vinyl group (ethenyl) that share electrons in a reaction known as covalent bonding. This process is what allows the synthetic chemical to be made into plastics, such as polystyrene, synthetic rubber, and latex.

Used To Manufacture Parts For Applications
  • Cars
  • Boats
  • Plumbing pipes
  • Fiberglass
  • Insulation
  • Building materials
  • Electrical components
  • Plastic drinking cups
  • Food storage containers